Carson City Historical Society - Past events

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Mailing address: 112 North Curry St., Carson City, NV 89703
Address for Foreman-Roberts House Museum: 1207 North Carson St., Carson City, NV

"Dedicated to Preserving Carson City's History"



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Carson City Historical Society



The Carson City Historical Society (EIN 94-2565777) is located at the Foreman-Roberts House Museum, 1207 North Carson Street, Carson City, Nevada. Our mailing address is 112 North Curry St., Carson City, NV 89703. The Carson City Historical Society is a nonprofit organization that operates and maintains the Foreman-Roberts House Museum.

Carson City Historical Society - Past events


General Membership Meeting and Election of Officers
Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021

Image of meeting gavel

On January 7, 2021, at 7:00 p.m. we will have Election of Officers Via Zoom. The Carson City Historical Society intends to maintain the current officers for the 2021 calendar year. Here is the proposed slate of officers:

  • Jeff Loflin, President
  • Sue Ballew, 1st Vice President
  • Travis Legaske, 2nd Vice President
  • David Bugli, Secretary
  • Kiyoshi Nishikawa, Treasurer
  • Andi Fant, Membership
  • Kat Long, Exhibits
  • Donna McLaren, Facilities

On January 11, 2021, at 3:45 p.m. there will be a Carson City Historical Society Board Meeting via Zoom. Members may attend as guests.

Please let us know if you are interested in attending either of these meetings via Zoom, and we will share the appropriate links with you.



More than a Ghost Town: Cultural Resource Management
in the Phantom City of Rhyolite, Nevada
Jonah Blustain Lecture on Rhyolite
Thursday, January 21, 2021

NOTE: A video of this lecture is now available on the Carson City Historical Society's YouTube channel: Click HERE for the channel and click on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dc-P1L41ep4 to go directly to the video.

Photograph of Cook Bank Building in Rhyolite

Jonah S. Blustain, BLM Assistant Field Manager, will present a lecture, "More than a Ghost Town: Cultural Resource Management in the Phantom City of Rhyolite, Nevada" on Thursday, January 21, 2021, at 7:30 p.m. via Zoom.

The ghost town of Rhyolite, Nevada, is one of the more challenging public resources to manage. The town was originally the site of a large gold strike in 1904. By 1907, the early tent city had become a veritable metropolis. Rhyolite had running water, municipal utilities, three railroads, and a swimming pool. The boom ended as soon as it began, aided by the 1907 financial panic. With no viable mines, Rhyolite soon became a ghost town. Located on public land adjacent to the town of Beatty and the main entrance to Death Valley National Park, Rhyolite receives approximately 250,000 visitors per year. The Bureau of Land Management is tasked with managing the town's historical values and recreational opportunities for future generations. This lecture will cover some of the site's current management challenges, the solutions developed by the BLM, and the ways the public can get involved in preserving a unique, irreplaceable resource.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For information about attending, contact David Bugli at 775-883-4154 or send an email to Dcbugli@aol.com and he will provide you with a meeting link (or a meeting ID with passcode).

Jonah Blustain earned a degree in Anthropology and Archaeology from Boston University before moving out west to Nevada. He received a master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Nevada, Reno, in which he developed an archaeological management plan for the remains of Nevada's Cold War-era uranium mining industry. Before moving into government service, he worked as a professional archaeologist contracting to Nevada's mining industry. As a mining archaeologist, Jonah worked on all aspects of mine permitting in contexts ranging from early Gold Rush prospecting camps to operating world-class mines. He currently serves in the U. S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, as the Assistant Field Manager for Non-Renewable Resources, Tonopah Field Office, in Tonopah, Nevada.

Photo: The Cook Bank Building in Rhyolite. Photo credit: Tahoenathan



CCHS Presents Lecture: "The Cocktail and Alcohol Culture of Virginia City,"
Thursday, February 18, 2021

NOTE: A video of this lecture is now available on the Carson City Historical Society's YouTube channel: Click HERE for the channel and click on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewPEwcNVr5E to go directly to the video.

Photograph of Garrett Barmore in the Keck Museum

The Carson City Historical Society will present its second lecture of 2021, "The Cocktail and Alcohol Culture of Virginia City," on Thursday, February 18, 2021, at 7:30 p.m. on Zoom. Garrett Barmore, curator of the W. M. Keck Earth Science and Mineral Engineering Museum at the University of Nevada, Reno, will present this entertaining lecture. He will discuss the history of several alcoholic beverages and how they relate to daily life in Virginia City during the mining boom. Barmore, who will be demonstrating the making of these drinks, is an entertaining lecturer.

The lecture includes include 3 cocktail recipes and a bonus punch recipe, which can be downloaded prior to the lecture by clicking HERE. Attendees may wish to acquire the ingredients ahead of time and try their hand at making one or more of the drinks. Some of the more obscure ingredients, such as pineapple gum syrup, are available at Total Wine and other liquor stores.

The February 18 lecture is free and open to the public. For information about attending via Zoom, contact David Bugli at 775-883-4154 or send an email to Dcbugli@aol.com and he will provide you with a meeting link (or a meeting ID with passcode).

You can see Barmore's explorations of the earth sciences on his "Mineral Monday" series at https://www.unr.edu/mackay/keck-museum/mineral-monday. Barmore received his Master's Degree in Museology from the University of Washington and specializes in professionalizing small museums. Garrett is very interested in Nevada mining history and has worked as a historical archaeologist in Nevada.

Photo: Garrett Barmore in the Keck Museum



"Notable Women of Eagle Valley" Exhibits opening
Saturday, March 20, 2021

Temporary image

On Saturday, March 20, 2021, CCHS will have a new exhibit opening at the Roberts House Carriage House called "Notable Women of Eagle Valley." According to Acting President, Sue Ballew, "It is beautiful."

We will have a soft opening of the exhibit Saturday, March 20, from 1 to 3 p.m. and continue opening on each Saturday thereafter in the Carriage House. Attendees are asked to please wear a mask.

Our exhibits chairperson Kat Long and Andrea Hobbs have been working on this display for many months along with many local artists. Each month one of the women in the exhibit will be featured in the CCHS newsletter.



Planned Open House and "Notable Women" display cancelled for April 3rd
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Photograph of wall in the Carriage House

The Carson City Historical Society Open House and display of the "Notable Women of Eagle Valley" exhibit in the Carriage House has been cancelled for Saturday, April 3, 2021. The Society plans to resume opening of the exhibit on Saturdays beginning April 10. The exhibit contains information about eight remarkable women of the Eagle Valley (Carson City) area who made significant contributions to the Carson City area. Their stories are accompanied by portraits of them, created for the exhibit by five local artists.



"Notable Women of Eagle Valley" exhibit featured Saturday at
Carson City Historical Society's Carriage House
Saturday, May 1, 2021

Photograph of wall in the Carriage House

The Carson City Historical Society will open the doors for their newest exhibit, "Notable Women of Eagle Valley," Saturday, May 1, 2021, from 1 to 3 p.m. in their Carriage House, 1207 North Carson Street, Carson City.

The Carriage House is directly behind the Foreman-Roberts House. The Exhibit is free and open to the public. Please wear a mask. If you have questions please email us at Carsoncityhistoricalsociety@gmail.com.

The exhibit contains information about eight remarkable women of the Eagle Valley (Carson City) area who made significant contributions to the Carson City area. Their stories are accompanied by portraits of them, created for the exhibit by five local artists.



Notable Women Exhibit
Saturday, June 5, 2021

Photograph of wall in the Carriage House

The "Notable Women of Eagle Valley" Exhibit can be viewed in the Carriage House behind the Foreman-Roberts House on Saturday, June 5, 2021, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. Admission is free.

Our exhibits chairperson Kat Long and Andrea Hobbs have been working on this display for many months along with many local artists. Each month one of the women in the exhibit will be featured in the newsletter. The exhibit is now open the first Saturday of each month until October from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Carriage House.



Catered Picnic and Chautauqua Coming
Sunday, June 27, 2021

Photograph of Kim Harris in costume

The CCHS will be having a catered picnic Sunday, June 27, 2021, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Roberts House Park and Carriage House. Chatauquan Kim Harris will portray the beautiful Laura Fair, the first woman in California sentenced to hang for the murder of her lover.

Performing as a Chautauquan for over 10 years via her business, "Western History ALIVE!" Kim Harris regularly portrays several local and national historic figures which include Pony Express rider Warren Upson, stagecoach driver Charley Parkhurst, Genoa and Nevada suffragist Lillian Virgin Finnegan, frontierswoman Calamity Jane, and acquitted axe murderess Lizzie Borden. Unlike a character actor or actress simply reciting a script, Chautauquans are essentially historians who research their chosen character's life, write a monologue to perform the character, endlessly rehearse their presentation and then present the character to a live audience. All the while they stay in character until the very end when questions can be answered by the historians themselves.

Reservations opened June 1, and only 25 slots are available! For reservations, call Paula at (775)887-8865, or Noni at (908)415-4820. The picnic includes a box lunch from KFC in the park, water, the Chautauqua in the Carriage House, a tea cup plant sale, business meeting, and a 50/50 raffle.

Photograph of Kim Harris in costume, dressed as Libbie Custer, another of the famous individuals Ms. Harris portrays.



CW Presents Lecture on "The Strychnine Banjo"
Thursday, July 15, 2021

Photograph of musician and author, Chris Bayer

CW Bayer will present a lecture on Thursday, July 15, 2021, at 7:30 p.m. on Zoom. A history fundamental to understanding the gold rush, western culture and American music, in his talk, "The Strychnine Banjo," CW Bayer summarizes the long-lost story of the most important mining song written in the far West during the 19th century - "The Days of '49." Composed as a parody for a burlesque in Virginia City, Nevada, during 1868 by banjoist Charley Rhoades, "The Days of '49" became the anthem of the "pioneers" - the '49ers as they aged through the remainder of the 19th century. The talk is based on original research by CW and his book, The Strychnine Banjo. The talk provides a great opportunity to hear the outlines of the history and then discuss it with the author.

CW Bayer can sometimes be heard playing music locally with The Honky Tonk Bums. He has researched and written several books about Nevada history. These include: Dreaming Up Nevada Territory, the story of Major William Ormsby, The Strychnine Banjo, Charley Rhoades, Jake Wallace and The Days of 49, and Reno's Jazz Hysteria - cabaret and ballroom. His most recent history book is Flying Without Instruction. All can be found at nevadamusic.com.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For information about attending, send an email to Dcbugli@aol.com or contact David Bugli at 775-883-4154 and he will provide you with a meeting link (or a meeting ID with passcode).



A Message from Sue Ballew, President,
Concerning Open House: Foreman Robers House and Carriage House
Media release: July 18, 2021

The beautiful gothic style Foreman-Roberts House, 1207 North Carson Street (yellow house), Carson City, Nevada, will be open to the public Sunday, July 25, 2021, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. Docents will tell the story of the Roberts family and their connection to the seeress Eilley Bowers, how the house came to Carson City in 1874, facts about the family and the famous spiritualist of the home.

The Carriage House will also be open 1:00 to 3:00 pm. The current exhibit is "Notable Women of Eagle Valley." Original portraits of women that tell highlights of their lives are on display. Noted local artists have used their talent to render images of these "Notable" women.

Both the Foreman-Roberts House and the Carriage House will be open. The Open House is free and open to the public. Donations are accepted. Masks are optional.



Foreman-Roberts House Grand Reopening
Sunday, July 25, 2021

Photograph of FRH

Carson City Historical Society will be having a Grand Reopening of the Foreman-Roberts House Museum on Sunday, July 25, 2021, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. This is a free event. Our volunteers have been working on updating the displays in the Foreman-Roberts House since the fires in the building in August of 2016. This is your opportunity to get familiar with some of Carson City history. Details are pending.

This structure is a fine example of Gothic Revival architecture. In 1873 it was moved to Carson City. James Doane Roberts was co-owner of the Roberts and Corbett's Saloon (across the street from the V&T depot). Hattie was the granddaughter of Calvin Hale, founder of the Hale and Norcross mine in Virginia City. Hattie, a direct descendent of American patriot Nathan Hale, was a former employee of the State of Nevada. Thurman Roberts willed the property to the children of Nevada, and it became the property of Carson City (then Ormsby County). The Public Works Department planned to raze it to form a small park. The outcry of the citizenry brought about the creation of the Nevada Landmark's Society which enlisted the aid of the local citizens to save it. (On August 20, 2002, Nevada Landmarks became the Carson City Historical Society.) The City Council agreed to a year's extension to restore and stabilize the structure. A stone foundation was installed with the aid of anyone who was interested, including state prison inmates. Others turned out to paint and refurbish the house, with many thousands of hours of volunteer services and dollars expended.



CCHS to Host Artist Ronnie Rector during Open Studios Tour
Aug. 21 and 22, 2021

Ronnie Rector's Strawberries & Mint painting

The Carson City Historical Society is hosting artist Ronnie Rector during the Third Annual Open Studios Tour on Saturday and Sunday, August 21 and 22, 2021. The CCHS Carriage house is one of 11 stops on the tour, which will be on-going from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. both days. The event is free, and information about the tour is available at https://jazzcarsoncity.com/arttour2021. The tour is part of the Jazz & Beyond Music & Art Festival (Aug. 13-29, 2021).

Ronnie Rector painted portraits for two of the "Women of Eagle Valley" women. The exhibit is still up in the Carriage House, and she will be there with her other paintings and will do a demonstration. Her "Strawberries & Mint" painting is shown here. The Carriage House will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be music by Mylo McCormick from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. both days.

The Foreman-Roberts House will be open those two days from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. for tours. There is no cost for these events. Donations are accepted at the Foreman-Roberts House. COVID restrictions apply. Please wear a mask.



Samantha Szesciorka presents Lecture on "Long Riding"
Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021

Photograph of Samantha and her Nevada Discovery Ride team

Carson City Historical Society is proud to host Samantha Szesciorka presenting a lecture on "Long Riding" on Zoom on Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021, at 7:30 p.m.

Samantha is the Vice President of Marketing and Public Relations at American Discovery Trail (Nevada State Coordinator); Assistant Curator at the Wilbur D. May Center; and a Long Rider at Nevada Discovery Ride. She is a former Army journalist and moved to Nevada in 2007. Samantha has been called Nevada's Trail Boss. She is passionate about Nevada and public lands, and loves to explore (with or without a horse). She serves as the State Coordinator for the American Discovery Trail - the nation's only coast-to-coast trail for hikers, bikers, and equestrians. Samantha is also a former equestrian magazine editor. She lives outside Reno with her herd of three horses, one dog, one cat, one pig, and a flock of chickens.

She fell in love with the wild horses and the Silver State. To encourage people to consider wild horse adoption, she set out on the first "Nevada Discovery Ride" several years ago. The public was able to follow her progress on her recent 550-mile ride from Las Vegas to Carson City on NevadaDiscoveryRide.com.

The latest adventure began on May 1, 2021, in fabulous Las Vegas! For nearly 45 days, the team trekked to Carson City along a 550+ miles route through the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts. The adventure took them through state parks, ghost towns, historic trails, and much more! The Nevada Discovery Ride promotes wild horse adoption, public land preservation, and Nevada! This year's ride also celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burro Act.

Samantha relies on her team to accomplish her long rides. Members of her team are her, her horse (Fremont, the newest member of the team), and canine member Juniper, an Idaho Shag (Bearded Collie mix). Juniper was born on a ranch in Idaho and joined the team at three months old. She started hitting the trail as a puppy, and now at 2 years old she loves riding and camping. Juniper also enjoys moving cows, chasing jackrabbits and coyotes, and guarding the ranch.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For information about attending, please send an email to Dcbugli@aol.com or contact David Bugli at 775-883-4154, and he will provide you with a meeting link (or a meeting ID with passcode).

Photo: Samantha and her Nevada Discovery Ride team.



CCHS highlights Foreman-Roberts House at Sunday open house
Sunday, Sept. 26, 2021

Photograph of Foreman_Roberts House

The beautiful gothic style Foreman-Roberts House at 1207 North Carson Street, Carson City will be open to the public, Sunday, Sept. 26, from 1 to 3 p.m. Docents will tell the story of the Roberts family and their connection to Eilley Bowers, how the house came to Carson City in 1874, and facts about the famous spiritualist of the home.

The Carriage House, adjacent to the Foreman-Roberts House, will also be open 1 to 3 pm. The current exhibit is "Notable Women of Eagle Valley." Original portraits of women that tell highlights of their lives are on display. Noted local artists have used their talent to render images of "Notable" women.

Both the Foreman-Roberts House and the Carriage House will be open. The Open House is free and open to the public. Donations are accepted. Masks are required. Go here for more information.



Lectures being planned for two dates
Thursday, Oct. 21, and Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021

future lectures logo

The Carson City Historical Society's lecture series is planning lecture events in October and November. These events are presented over Zoom, and will eventually be posted on the historical society's YouTube channel (after post-production processing).

On Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021, at 7:30 p.m., Lisa Jayne will present a lecture on Maj. William Garrard, an early Carson City settler, an assistant to two Nevada Governors, a Warden of the state prison, and superintendent of the Mint. He was also her great great great grandfather. Lisa has done a lot of research into her notable family (see lanefamilyhistory.org/) and has done restoration work on the Donovan Mill in Silver City.

On Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021, at 7:30 p.m., Michelle Schmitter and an assistant or two will present a lecture on restoration work on antique windows. Note that this will be on the second Thursday of the month, rather than the usual third Thursday. There will be no lecture in December.

These lectures are free and open to the public. For information about attending, please send an email to Dcbugli@aol.com or contact David Bugli at 775-883-4154, and he will provide you with a meeting link (or a meeting ID with passcode).



Lisa Jayne to present lecture on Maj. William Garrard
Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021

Composite image of Maj. William Garrard and Lisa Jayne.

On Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021, at 7:30 p.m., Lisa Jayne will present a lecture on Maj. William Garrard, an early Carson City settler, an assistant to two Nevada Governors, a Warden of the state prison, and Superintendent of the Mint. He was also her great great great grandfather.

William Mountjoy Garrard was born in Goose Creek Salt Works, Kentucky, March 17, 1822, to Daniel Garrard and Lucinda Jane Toulmin Garrard. He was the grandson of Kentucky's second Governor, James Garrard. In 1846 he was a 25-year-old lawyer, and he enlisted in the US Infantry at a second lieutenant. He served under his brother in Company E 16th US Infantry in Cerralvo, Mexico. In 1849 the brothers emigrated to California, but his brother eventually returned to Kentucky to handle the family's salt works business.

By 1870 William and his family, including their 3 youngest children, were living in Virginia City. From 1875 to 1879 William Garrard served as the private secretary for his old friend, Lewis Bradley, during his term as the second governor of Nevada. He also served as private secretary for the fourth Governor, Jewett W. Adams, from 1883 to 1885.

Lisa Jayne has done considerable research into her notable family (see lanefamilyhistory.org) and has done restoration work on the Donovan Mill in Silver City. She also volunteered doing history research for the Nevada State Museum and UNR Special Collections Alf Doten Diaries project.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For information about attending, please send an email to Dcbugli@aol.com or contact David Bugli at 775-883-4154, and he will provide you with a meeting link (or a meeting ID with passcode).

Pictured: Maj. William Garrard and his great great great granddaughter, presenter Lisa Jayne.



CCHS presents lecture/presentation on "Rehabilitating Historic Windows"
Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021

Photograph of some windows at Adele's Restaurant

Carson City Historical Society (CCHS) is proud to host a lecture/presentation on "Rehabilitating Historic Windows" on Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021, at 7:30 p.m. via Zoom. Historic wood windows are valuable character-defining features of a building, worth retaining for architectural and environmental reasons. In the "Rehabilitating Historic Windows" presentation, professionals and Carson City Historic Resource Commission members Michelle Schmitter, Mike Drews, and Lou Ann Speulda-Drews, will explore the history and nomenclature of sash windows.

The audience will learn about the evolution of historic designs and construction methods. The presenters will review endemic problems that lead to deterioration and explore possible maintenance and repair techniques to extend sustainable service life. The presenters will consider the benefits for retaining, rather than replacing, historic wood windows. The audience can learn how maintained wooden windows with storms can surpass modern window application in energy efficiency, while maintaining the original character of an older home. Mike Drews will demonstrate how to care for wooden windows and common problems that often lead homeowners towards replacement rather than repair.

Michelle Schmitter has over 25 years of experience in the field of Historic Preservation. Michelle meets and exceeds the National Park Service qualification standards for architectural historian, works within the Secretary of InteriorŐs Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, and has extensive technical experience with multiple preservation, restoration, rehabilitation, and reconstruction projects.

Michael Drews is the Principal at Great Basin Consulting Group, LLC, a cultural resource firm specializing in cultural resource inventories, predictive models, and National Register evaluations. He has served on the Carson City Historic Resources Commission under appointment by the County Board of Supervisors since 1989 and is intimately familiar with preservation of the historic built environment, effectively promoting historic values, and the intricacies of implementing local and Federal grants.

Lou Ann Speulda-Drews grew up in Oregon's Willamette Valley and graduated with BS and MA degrees from Oregon State University, majoring in History and Anthropology/Archaeology. She also took classes at the University of OregonŐs School of Historic Preservation and Architecture. Lou Ann has been working for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) since 1995 and travels widely throughout the five western states and the Pacific as part of her regional responsibilities, focusing on historical archaeology and historic architecture. As part of her responsibilities for USFWS, Lou Ann has participated in the rehabilitation of buildings that included repairing original wood frame windows.

Note that this lecture will be on the second Thursday of the month, rather than the usual third Thursday. There will be no lecture in December.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For information about attending, please send an email to Dcbugli@aol.com or contact David Bugli at 775-883-4154, and he will provide you with a meeting link (or a meeting ID with passcode).

Note: A PowerPoint handout for this lecture is available by clicking HERE.

Pictured: Michelle Schmitter, Mike Drews, and Lou Ann Speulda-Drews to discuss "Rehabilitating Historic Windows.



Links to other past pages.

Past events in 2006

Past events in 2007

Past events in 2008

Past events in 2009

Past events in 2010

Past events in 2011

Past events in 2012

Past events in 2013

Past events in 2014

Past events in 2015

Past events in 2016

Past events in 2017

Past events in 2018

Past events in 2019

Past events in 2020


This page last updated 11/18/2021

This website is funded by the Carson City Historical Society.
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or use this e-mail address: Dcbugli@aol.com. Put "CCHS report" in the subject line.